Triggering Vocabulary

Posted: 12 May, 2015 in Uncategorized
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Hey all it’s time for another round of vocab. It’s been a while since I put one of these up. The last few books I read were either audio or belonged to a friend so I wasn’t able to mark it up and come back to it later.

Anyhow, this round we’ve got another one by Neil Gaiman, Trigger Warning.

For anyone new to this, I like marking up my books as I read them. When I finish something I sometimes post a bit of what I’ve marked. It’s usually either, words I didn’t know or words I think are not used often enough, cultural references, and words I think are worth sharing.

 

 

What we learn about ourselves in those moments, where the trigger has been squeezed, is this: the past is not dead. There are things that wait for us, patiently, in the dark corridors of our lives.

 

Desiccate – to dry out; often for the purposes of preserving

 

Are Fictions safe places? …Should they be safe places?

 

Alec – a somewhat autobiographical comic book by Eddie Campbell

 

Grand Guignol – “the theatre of the big puppet” a theatre in Paris popular in the early 20th century. Known for their particularly grotesque and horrifying work.

 

Hebrides – archipelago off the coast of Scotland

 

Did you know May the third was the day that the devil was cast out of heaven, and thus the day on which it is unpardonable to commit a crime?

 

Imitable – capable or worthy of being imitated

 

Ruminant – an animal with more than one stomach, like sheep or cows

 

The finest things I have seen are dead places.

 

Awl – a metal spike for punching holes in leather

 

Whirligig – pinwheel

 

Ducks don’t like socks, they said, it’s a duck thing

 

Inveigh – to rail against something, or communicate with great hostility in regards to

 

Lassitude – physical and mental weariness

 

Apiary – where bees/beehives are kept

 

Punctilious – showing great attention to detail, particularly regarding correct conduct

 

I sometimes imagine I would like my ashes to be scattered in a library. But then the librarians would just have to come in early the next morning to sweep them up again

 

Okapi – a mammal native to central Africa, kinda like a giraffe but zebra type stripes on their legs and ass and… well here’s a picture.

 

 

Jack Benny – vaudevillian comic from the early to mid-20th century

 

Ducal – relating to a Duke

 

Quiescent – inactive, dormant

 

She was waiting for him, in the place where flowers die.

 

Reynard – fox (French), or a trickster character from a French fables

 

Shighthound – hounds that hunt by sight and speed rather than scent and endurance.

 

Drystone – style of construction popular Northern Britain and Western Ireland, in which stones are interlocked without mortar

 

Hawthorn – a tree, it looks like this

Shows up in folklore, as the entrance to the otherworld, also as the crown of thorns used on Jesus.

 

Secateurs – pruning clippers

 

Obverse – the ‘heads’ side of a coin. The counterpart of a fact.

 

Druids, Norse, Catholics, Protestants, doesn’t matter. That’s what people pay lip service to. The old religion is what gets the crops up and keeps your cock hard and makes sure that nobody builds a bloody great motorway through an area of outstanding beauty.

 

Pusillanimous – timid, lacking in courage

 

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